The Savvy Path

    Tea & Crumpets

    [fa icon="user"] Donna Morin [fa icon="folder-open'] Gatherings, Tea

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    Tea Party? 

    Downton Abbey may be TV history now, but my obsession with all things Brit still lives on. While there are many reasons to be a fan of the BBC, I am not ashamed to admit that one of the reasons I listen is for the accents. (Well, okay, maybe a little ashamed.) Sometimes I add a “u” to favorite and color, just for fun. My fantasy bucket list includes a pub sing-along with Jude Law and a mug of Newscastle Beer sloshing to and fro.

    So with anglophilia like mine, it makes sense that my party plans for this year include tea and crumpets and dainty china cups. I am a huge fan of tea, but even so I don’t think my consumption comes close to what they down across the pond. While we in America are big on coffee, Brits drink over 60 billion cups of tea every year.  Tea is, in fact, the most consumed beverage worldwide, after water.

    But what is tea without crumpets? I have yet to make crumpets. Truth be told, I had to research what the heck a crumpet was.  I found recipes for these English muffin look-alikes here and here. 

    I figure if I run out of time, I’m guessing store-bought English muffins will do just fine. Cake and biscotti work, too.

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    A Savvy Girl's Night Tea Tasting 

    As a Savvy gal, this will be an opportunity to introduce a few of my favorite nontoxic tea flavors, like Traditional Medicinals Licorice Root and Nighty Night.  At this time of year, I get to enjoy fresh mint growing in my backyard, too.  Tea leaves are a beneficial part of any healthy lifestyle, and a number of studies have found the antioxidants and other compounds in various teas help reduce risk of certain diseases, improve mood and focus, and boost immunity.

    Some tea bags, however, are treated with epichlorohydrin, a plastic that helps to keep the bags from breaking as they steep in your hot water. Epichlorohydrin is classified as a “probable” human carcinogen by the Environmental Protection Agency. While residue from this chemical in your tea is likely small, scientists are still working on ways to measure just how much exposure we get.

    Many teas also contain synthetic colors, flavors, and pesticide residues.  For more nontoxic tea options, check out this article from Clean Plates.vintage-1485644_640.jpg

    But this information doesn’t mean I can’t enjoy my cup of Rosy.

    My awareness simply means I can take another step to eliminate toxins from my life. In turn, I help my body to be strong enough to handle toxins I can’t avoid. The motto that drives my life these days is: I do what I can; I don’t stress about the rest.

    So I’m on the lookout for bits & bobs that will help make my gals’ night out be the dog’s bollocks. This website could even help us all get dolled up in vintage swag. How fun is that? Touch wood, we’ll all be together chin wagging soon!

     

     

    Looking for more creative ways to gather friends together? Let the fun begin with Savvy Gatherings. 

    Donna Morin

    Written by Donna Morin

    Donna Morin is a professional health advocate, writer, and certified health coach. You can find wellness tips and recipes through her website at www.betteroffwell.com

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